EDHD 320 Peer Relationships and Friendships Nov 2011

EDHD 320 Peer Relationships and Friendships Nov 2011 - EDHD...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
EDHD 320 Peer Relationships & Friendships November, 2011
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Where do peer relationships and attachments fit into social development? Figure 14.4 In the study by Simpson et al. (2007), relationship quality at each step in development affected relationship quality at the next step; n = 78 infants followed into their early 20s.
Image of page 2
First Peer Relationships: Infancy Infants have capacity for forming attachments to caregivers and for entering social relationships Babies show an interest in other babies at an early age By six months, infants prepared for lives in social groups (relate in meaningful way to more than one peer at a time) By 18 months engage in simple reciprocal complementary play with peers, e.g., enjoy imitating one another Around two years, begin taking-turns and demonstrate reciprocal exchange Infants raised in kibbutz with other infants may show true attachment to other infants as early as one year of age, e.g., they sought out particular playmates & missed them when they didn’t see them
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Peer Relationships: The Child Play Becomes More Social; ages 2 to 4 1/2 Parten’s model of social development in play Unoccupied play—child stands idly by Solitary play—play alone and are highly involved Onlooker play—begin to take interest in others but not very active Parallel play—child plays next to other children, not really with them Associative play—play involves interaction of conversation and material, but still not mutual goal Cooperative play—play involves common goal, collaboration, e.g., one pedals the toy fire truck & the other puts out the fire Parten sees older children engaging in solitary play to build skills
Image of page 4
Parten (1932)
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Peer Relationships: The Child -Play also becomes more imaginative Social pretend play—by age two to three, begin more elaborate and cooperative play » Social pretend play universal and more frequent with age » Actual quality of play highly influenced by culture » U.S. children like to play superhero; Korean children like to play family » Individualistic culture—e.g.,in U.S. -play aimed at asserting own identity » Collectivist culture—e.g., in Korea-play aimed at increasing harmony of ego
Image of page 6
Peer Relationships: The Child -What good is play? 19th century America children discouraged from play because it was thought to be frivolous; today play thought to mold little Einstein Play is evolved behavior helping children prepare for adult life Pretend play positively associated with cognitive development; those with imaginary playmates brightest Engaging in social pretend play allows children to hone social skills and construct theory of mind Play contributes to positive emotional development Emotional disturbances may be revealed in play behavior,e.g., 1) child re-enacted rape in my playroom with dolls; 2) 3 year old destroyed toy dump truck
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Peer Relationships: The Child -Peer Acceptance and Popularity
Image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern