lecture_24_s2005

Lecture_24_s2005 - 1.00 Lecture 24 Integration Reading for next time Numerical Recipes pp 347-368(Get as far as youre comfortable Numerical

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1.00 Lecture 24 Integration Reading for next time: Numerical Recipes, pp. 347-368 (Get as far as you’re comfortable) Numerical Integration Classical methods are of historic interest only Rectangular, trapezoid, Simpson’s Work well for integrals that are very smooth or can be computed analytically anyway Extended Simpson’s method is only elementary method of some utility for 1-D integration Multidimensional integration is tough If region of integration is complex but function values are smooth, use Monte Carlo integration (first exercise) If region is simple but function is irregular, split integration into regions based on known sites of irregularity If region is complex and function is irregular, or if sites of function irregularity are unknown, give up We’ll cover 1-D extended Simpson’s method only See Numerical Recipes chapter 4 for more
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Monte Carlo Integration x y z=f(x,y) Integrate f(x,y) over Circular Area r 2r 2r Randomly generate points in square 4r 2 . Odds that they’re in the circle are π r 2 / 4r 2 , or π / 4. This is Monte Carlo integration, with f(x,y)= 1 If f(x,y) varies slowly, then evaluate f(x,y) at each sample point in limits of integration and sum (0,0)
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Integration over Circular Area public class MonteCarloIntegration { public static double circularIntegral() { int nIter= 1000000; double sum= 0.0, radius= 0.5; for (int i=0; i < nIter; i++) { // Math.random() returns double d: 0 <= d <= 1 double x= Math.random() - radius; // Ctr at 0,0 double y= Math.random() - radius; double f= 1.0; // f(x,y)—constant here if ((x*x + y*y) < radius*radius) // If in region sum += f; // Increment integral sum } return sum/nIter; // Integral value } public static void main(String[] args) { System.out.println(“Result: “ +circularIntegral() ); System.out.println(“Pi: “+ 4.0*circularIntegral() ); } } Integration over Circular Area, 2 // To integrate f(x,y) = exp (x)/(y*y+1) over this area: public class MonteCarloIntegration2 { public static double circularIntegral() { // for loop, random x, y same as previous slide // … double f= Math.exp(x)/(y*y+1); if ((x*x + y*y) < radius*radius) // If in region sum += f; // Increment integral sum } return sum/nIter; // Integral value } public static void main(String[] args) { System.out.println(“Result: “ +circularIntegral() ); } } // Numerical integration is used when functions and areas // of integration are really complex and ugly!
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Exercises: Take Your Pick Find the shaded area within circles below: Use circularIntegral() as your starting point Use f(x,y)= 1 to find the areas below using integration Equation of circle is (x-x c ) 2
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course CIVIL 1.00 taught by Professor Georgekocur during the Spring '05 term at MIT.

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Lecture_24_s2005 - 1.00 Lecture 24 Integration Reading for next time Numerical Recipes pp 347-368(Get as far as youre comfortable Numerical

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