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lecture03 - Class 3 The Eclipse IDE Introduction to...

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Introduction to Computation Introduction to Computation and Problem Solving and Problem Solving Prof. Steven R. Lerman Prof. Steven R. Lerman and and Dr. V. Judson Harward Dr. V. Judson Harward Class 3: The Eclipse IDE Class 3: The Eclipse IDE 2 What is an IDE? An integrated development environment (IDE) is an environment in which the user performs the core development tasks: Naming and creating files to store a program Writing code (in Java or another language) Compiling code (checks correctness, generates an executable binary) Debugging and testing the code And many other tasks: version control, projects, code generation, etc. Eclipse is one of the “standard” Java IDEs and the one that we will use in 1.00 for labs, tutorials and homework 1
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3 Why Use an IDE? The alternative to an IDE is a ‘command line’ interface: Not visual Tools for each task are generally not tightly integrated 1.00 students in past terms have not used good software development practice with command line interfaces Neither do many industry programmers While you can do the same things with a command line interface as an IDE, in fact people don’t People write software better with an IDE The learning curve for an IDE is about the same as for command line tools, so it’s what we use in 1.00 4 What Do IDEs Do? What does an IDE provide? Visual representation of program components Ability to browse existing components easily, so you can find ones to reuse Quick access to help and documentation on existing libraries and tools (vs writing your own) Better feedback and error messages when there are errors in your program A debugger, which is not primarily used to debug, but is used to read and verify code Communication between programmers in a team, who share a common view of the program 2
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5 Before Starting Eclipse Create a folder for your Java files In Windows Explorer, create folders: Java Lectures Lecture3 Put each homework, tutorial, and lecture projects each in a separate folder Java thinks that files in the same directory are closely related 6 Starting Eclipse Start Eclipse by double clicking the icon on your desktop.
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