Kennedy--Rhet. in Greece and Rome Questions

Kennedy--Rhet. in Greece and Rome Questions - They were...

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Reading Questions 1: Kennedy—Rhetoric in Greece and Rome 1. The distinctive features of Greek and Roman rhetoric, compared to rhetorics from other parts of the world, are the unusual contentiousness of public address in Greece and Rome, the development of judicial rhetoric beyond what is found in other areas, and the resulting creation of a system of rhetorical education that Is distinct from other areas of study. 2. Oral poets believed that their creations were inspired from a source outside themselves, resulting from a lack of conscious reflection about composition, which more rationally can be thought a product of original genius, imitation of traditional themes and poetic technique, an “ear” for what sounded right, and expression of cultural values and assumptions. Greek literature, from the beginning, had a quality that appealed to a common sense of nationality and shared experience. 3. Rather than settling differences peacefully and quietly, the Greeks are argumentative.
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Unformatted text preview: They were contentious from the beginning, and acceptance and indulgence of open contention and rivalry has remained a characteristic of Western society except when suppressed by powerful authority of church or state. 4. Voting affected rhetorical practice because it provided an answer to how to make a decision in a contentious society, but in the process, also polarized views and encouraged contentiousness. 5. Sophists taught public address in their schools, largely in the form of epideictic speeches. They also converted rhetoric from a conservative force transmitting and enhancing traditional values, to rhetoric as a tool of change. 6. A distinctive feature of rhetoric in Greece was the development of artistic judicial oratory. More importantly, it was the needs of the democratic law courts in Greece that created the discipline of rhetoric as taught and practiced in the West. 7. NOTED!...
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2008 for the course COMM 3300 taught by Professor Vogelaar,a during the Summer '08 term at Colorado.

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