density-buoyancy activity_V5

density-buoyancy activity_V5 - 1 Density and buoyancy...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 1 Density and buoyancy applied to geology Key terms: mass, volume, density, heat, salinity, fluid, buoyancy. 1. Rank the substances below (W, X, Y, Z) in order of increasing density . (For example, if you think W is the least dense, X is denser than W, Y is denser than X, and Z is the most dense, put W<X<Y<Z; if X and Y have the same density, put X=Y) Explain your answer how did you figure this out? 2. (PLEASE READ CAREFULLY HERE!) Professor Dense conducts an experiment to test the effect of temperature and salinity (saltiness) on the density of water. He starts with three beakers (A, B, and C) of distilled (pure) water, each with a volume of 1000 mL, and a mass of 1000g, at a temperature of 4C (he keeps them in a refrigerator). He keeps beaker A at 4C in the refrigerator, and does nothing else to it. He keeps beaker B at 4C, and adds as much table salt as he can get to dissolve. Professor Dense also takes beaker C out of the refrigerator and leaves it out on the counter, where it warms up to 25 C. The properties of water in each refrigerator and leaves it out on the counter, where it warms up to 25 C....
View Full Document

Page1 / 4

density-buoyancy activity_V5 - 1 Density and buoyancy...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online