118 Frey - Frey, Moral Standing, the Value of Lives, and...

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Frey, Moral Standing, the Value of Lives, and Speciesism (Sections i-iv) Overview : Takes a utilitarian perspective Animals have moral standing because they can suffer and their lives have some value. But human life is typically more valuable than animal life (the unequal value thesis). This derives from the greater richness typically found in human life. This in turn is the result of the autonomy humans have animals lack. The greater value of typical human lives justifies using animals in sufficiently valuable experiments even involving vivisecting them, using animal parts for human transplants, among other things. When is inflicting suffering justified? There should be a presumptions against using animals in experiments that make them suffer. But the presumption can be overcome by demonstrating the promise of the experiment to benefit humans. This would justify inflicting the suffering on the animals because of the greater value of typical human lives. Frey could be clearer about the principle he is relying on to justify this inference.
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This note was uploaded on 12/01/2011 for the course PHL 118 taught by Professor Garyfulle during the Fall '11 term at Central Mich..

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118 Frey - Frey, Moral Standing, the Value of Lives, and...

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