Autumns last experiment

Autumns last experiment - Autumns Last Experiment Autumn...

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Autumn’s Last Experiment Autumn Constance Central Michigan University Abstract Selective attention and response competition was investigated using a flanker paradigm task. There were 10 participants. RT and accuracy were measured. Congruency was varied with none, congruent, neutral and incongruent noises. The spacing of the flanker was also varied with 1, 3, or 8 spaces. RT for congruency and spacing showed a significant linear relationship.
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Congruency was also found to have a significant linear relationship on accuracy. These results show support for the theory of selective attention and response competition. Autumn’s Last Experiment Selective attention refers to focusing of attention on some perceptual inputs to the exclusion of others. Response competition causes a slowing of the correct response due to priming of incorrect responses. People use selective attention in every-day life in tasks such as reading and writing among other simple tasks. Response competition was tested by Eriksen (1974). Response competition shows failure of selective attention suggesting target and noise letters are both priming a response, which slows correct response. Selective attention and response competition was also tested by Zeef, Sonke, Kok, Buiten and Kenemans (1996) and has been recently tested by Sanders and Lamers (2003). Stadler and Hogan (1996) studied priming
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effects and their effect on selective attention. Priming is the implicit memory effect in which exposure to a stimulus influences the responses to later stimuli. Priming theory was also studied more recently by Paquet (2001). Eriksen (1974) created the flanker paradigm to test selective attention and response competition. Participants saw a single letter that appeared in a known location. Flankers or distractions appeared compatible, neutral or incompatible. Subjects were asked to press a right or left lever to indicate which letter they saw. Results showed an increased RT with incompatible flankers. These results suggest the ability to use the degree of response competition to measure the size of selective attention focus, the area to which we can restrict attention. Zeef, Sonke, Kok, Buiten and Kenemans (1996) continued research on the theory of selective attention to see if there was a difference in RT within different age groups. Participants were presented with central targets which were flanked by response. There were compatible or incompatible letters with high or low amounts of feature overlap with 4 positions. Results showed incompatible flankers produced more interference in older subjects, but only when flankers were close to the target letter. These results suggest with increased distance response
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Autumns last experiment - Autumns Last Experiment Autumn...

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