Mental Rotation of Images

Mental Rotation of Images - Mental Rotation Autumn...

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Mental Rotation Autumn Constance Central Michigan University
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Abstract The constant rate theory was investigated using a mental rotation task. Participants were asked to identify objects as matched or mirror images. Reaction time and accuracy were measured among the fourteen participants. Angle of rotation was the varied factor with levels including 0, 60, 120 and 180 degrees rotation. In this particular study reaction time was not found to be a linear function of angle of rotation which suggests a rejection of the constant rate theory.
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Mental Rotation of Images In the current experiment we investigated The constant rate theory and Mental Rotation developed by Shepard and Metzler (1971). Experiments were also performed by Cooper (1971) and, Pierret and Peronnet (1994). Mental rotation is how fast a person can mentally rotate an object. The theory hypothesis that increased angle rotation will increase reaction time creating a linear function. The experiment is in relation to everyday living with comparing objects and figures. Experiments have been being conducted testing these theories over the past centuries finding a wide array of results. Shepard and Metzler (1971) investigated constant rate theory. Participants saw two two- dimensional projections of three dimensional figures rotated in the picture plane or in depth and had to indicate whether the images were matched or mirrored. The results show a linear function between angle rotation and reaction time supporting The constant rate theory. Another experiment was conducted in 1971 by a psychologist by the name of Cooper. Cooper was also testing The constant rate theory looking to discover if reaction time was a linear function of angle. In this study the participants saw two figures and indicated if they were the same or mirror images in the first experiment. Results indicated a linear increase in reaction
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This note was uploaded on 12/01/2011 for the course PSY 385 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Central Mich..

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Mental Rotation of Images - Mental Rotation Autumn...

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