The Stroop Effect and Response Mode

The Stroop Effect and Response Mode - The Stroop Effect and...

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The Stroop Effect and Response Mode Autumn Constance Central Michigan University Abstract The Stroop effect was investigated along with the theory of automaticity, and translation using a Stroop task. College Participants were asked to identify the color of a word in either a task that involved multiple stimuli or a task that tested single stimuli. RT and accuracy were measured among the 30 participants. Congruency was varied with levels of congruent, neutral and incongruent. Type of response was also varied including both key press and vocal responses. Results found congruence as well as response mode to have a significant effect on RT. Congruence was also found to have an effect on accuracy while response mode did not. Our results showed support for the Stroop effect theory as well as the automaticity theory.
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Introduction In the current experiment the Stroop effect was examined to learn more about selective attention. Stroop effect is defined as the interference of incongruent color words when naming colors. This relates to everyday life in aspects of multi-tasking and paying attention. This includes attending to one aspect of a stimulus, listening to one conversation while ignoring another and having selective attention during reading. Automaticity theory and the theory of translation were also taken into account. Automaticity is the theory investigated by Logan and Zbrodoff (1998) that hypothesized some activities can occur without selective attention suggesting reading interferes with controlled attention of color naming. Sharma and McKenna (1998) proposed the translation hypothesis which states that colors are processed in semantic memory and words are processed in the lexicon creating more interference with vocal response. Salso, Henick and Robertson (2001) studied the Stroop experiment methods and proposed different tasks yielded different results. In the study by Ali, Green, Kherif, Devlin and Price
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(2010) the left head of caudate had a significant role in the control of word interference suggesting its suppressing of irrelevant words. Logan and Zbrodoff (1998) studied the theory of automaticity using a Stroop task. They studied automaticity incorporating a typing response in with the regular keypress and vocal responses. They predicted a Stroop effect among typewritten responses because typewritten responses should be strongly associated with words. The task was to identify the color of the word and not the word being presented. They expected the typewritten and vocal responses to have the same amount of interference due to the translation. Vocal and Typing responses in theory need more translation because words are processed in the lexicon and colors are processed in semantic memory. Participants were given a test for typing speed then three experimental conditions of 240 trials each followed by another typing test. Results yielded a significant
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This note was uploaded on 12/01/2011 for the course HDF 411 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '10 term at Central Mich..

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The Stroop Effect and Response Mode - The Stroop Effect and...

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