Mind's Eye Theatre Character Sheet Walkthrough.docx - Mind\u2019s Eye Theatre Character Sheet Walkthrough This guide will take you step-by-step through

Mind's Eye Theatre Character Sheet Walkthrough.docx -...

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Mind’s Eye Theatre Character Sheet Walkthrough This guide will take you step-by-step through creating your own character for play in Vampire: The Masquerade – Mind’s Eye Theatre. The basic concept of the game is simple. The person running the game is the “Storyteller,” who explains what you witness and see (perhaps with elaborate props) and you, as the player-character (PC, or simply character), make decisions to determine what you want to do. The game is entirely open-ended, based on a primary story told by the Storyteller. It may be a strange murder to solve, it may be the need of vampires to gain ground over others, it can be nearly anything. The basic premise behind the game is that vampires exist and they constantly hide themselves from human society. This is what the “Masquerade” means since they live among us and pretend to be human. Breaking the Masquerade in any way, such as showing off vampire powers to a group of humans, is strictly forbidden and cause for torture or execution. Vampires have a complex society like human beings and interact in a variety of ways, as the game will show. Play runs without any end, or until your character dies. Each game has a story, with often a puzzle or mystery to solve. Out of any rule you must know, vampires forbid fighting in “safe spaces” called “Elysium” and eating another vampire to get its powers (called “diablerie”) is also forbidden but possible if the vampire can keep it a secret. You should be careful to even mention this word in play. When playing, situations are given outcomes based on your character’s core abilities, but it always starts out with a simple test ruled over by the Storyteller. In the LARP environment this game is a simple test using the paper/rock/scissors to gain initiative and then points for your 1
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abilities are applied to see who “wins” the outcome to determine what happens. For example, if you were attempting to read an ancient object for information, by beating the storyteller in this simple game the effect occurs, but it may rely on your Intelligence points to be successful (more on Intelligence later). If not, you have to spend certain skill points to test again (that is, to play the paper/rock/scissors game again). But when fighting someone, for example, you may need to compare skill points to your opponent’s to see who ends up with the positive outcome (like perhaps their strength versus yours). This will make more sense as play begins and these are the basics of the game. In the live setting the core detail is you are playing as your character in reality . The regular game is much like Dungeons & Dragons but in the live setting what makes it more interesting is you begin to act as your character to get into the game. This does not mean you actually physically assault someone, etc., but acting and getting in to the role is what makes it more enjoyable for everyone. The game can be very entertaining, but this depends on how everyone is engaging the story, and it will naturally develop its own twists and turns as players make their decisions. What this means is
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