8. New Monarchy

8. New Monarchy - 8. Experimenting with Monarchy: Charles I...

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8. Experimenting with Monarchy: Charles I and Louis XIV I. Divine Right Rule and Personal Rule (17 th century – everything is up for negotiation; everything is up for change) a. James VI of Scotland, I of England (1603 – 1625) a.i. Successor of Elizabeth I; he rules over England and Scotland but they are two separate countries; son of Mary, Queen of Scots. a.ii. Advanced a theory of monarchy known as Divine Right Rule. It sets up a system where the monarch has absolute power; allows himself to distance himself from everybody. a.ii.1. The King has been divinely selected and appointed by God. a.ii.2. Kings answer only to God. a.ii.3. Subjects, under a divine right ruler, have no right to resist. a.iii. However, under the English Constitution (Magna Carta), Kings must rule through the English Parliament – the House of Lords (by birthright) and the House of Commons (ordinary people). Sets up a collision course between a divine ruler and a powerful parliament. b.
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8. New Monarchy - 8. Experimenting with Monarchy: Charles I...

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