Lecture 29 (21.4)

Lecture 29 (21.4) - Naming Coordination Compounds The...

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Naming Coordination Compounds 1. The cation is named before the anion. 2. The ligands are named before the metal ion. 3. An o is added to the root name of an anionic ligand, for a neutral ligand the name of the molecule is used with a few exceptions: H 2 O = aqua; NH 3 = ammine; CH 3 NH 2 = methylamine; CO = carbonyl; NO = nitrosyl. 4. The prefixes mono-, di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexa- are used to denote the number of simple ligands.
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Naming Coordination Compounds 5. The prefixes bis-, tris-, and tetrakis- are used for complicated ligands (polydentate), or ones that already contain di- and tri-. 6. The oxidation state of the metal ion is designated by a Roman numeral in parentheses. 7. When more than one type of ligand is present, they are listed alphabetically. 8. If the complex has a negative charge, the suffix –ate is added to the name of the metal.
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y When some metal ions are involved in anionic complex ions we have to use their latin names: Stannate Tin (Sn) Aurate
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This note was uploaded on 12/01/2011 for the course CHEM 105BL taught by Professor Warshel during the Spring '07 term at USC.

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Lecture 29 (21.4) - Naming Coordination Compounds The...

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