intro to the nervous system lecture

intro to the nervous system lecture - Introduction to the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Introduction to the Nervous System By Dr. R. Hazell “Nervous systems perform the three overlapping functions of sensory input , integration , and motor output .” Neurons: the functional cell of nervous systems are specialized for the fast transmission of impulses, up to 150 m/sec or 350 mph!
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fundamental Purpose of the Nervous System 1. Sensory input : receive information from receptors (specialized structures that detect changes in the body or in the external environment) and take it up to the CNS ( afferents). 2. Neural integration : process incoming information and determine appropriate response 3. Motor output : send commands to effectors (mainly muscles and glands) that carry out the body’s responses. *** causes muscle contractions or effect.
Background image of page 2
How Do We Put it Together? I.e. You are driving your car to school. 1. Motor efferents & Sensory afferents are used to start the car and to back out of the driveway. 2. At the corner is a STOP sign. ***We use neural integration to figure out that we need to put on the BRAKES!!! 3. Traffic light stimulates all 3 processes.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Major parts of the nervous systems Central Nervous System (CNS): brain and spinal cord (cranial and spinal nerves) enclosed in the cranium and vertebral column respectively; neurons carry info in bundles called tracts Peripheral Nervous System (PNS): made of peripheral nerves & ganglia; neurons carry info in bundles called nerves ( everything outside of the CNS ) *Motor nerves carry info out to effectors/target organs *Sensory nerves carry from sensory receptors into the CNS
Background image of page 4
Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) in more detail 1. Sensory (afferent) Division A. Visceral sensory division : carries sensory info from visceral organs (GI tract. Respiratory, heart, urinary systems, etc.) B. Somatic sensory division : carries sensory info from skin, muscles, bones and joints 2. Motor (efferent) Division A. Somatic motor division : carries signals to skeletal muscles; under voluntary control B. Autonomic Nervous System : carries signals to glands, cardiac muscle and smooth muscle ; under involuntary control Parasympathetic mediates ‘rest and repose’ responses Sympathetic mediates “fight or flight’ responses
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Subdivisions of ANS 1. Sympathetic Nervous System =“Fight or Flight”. This is the part of the NS that accelerates” various parts of your NS response. i.e. You think of someone chasing you in the dark at night and you are alone. i.e. Increased HR, Increased sweat, pupillary dilation, increased RR, increased BP, ***DECREASED GI movement
Background image of page 6
= “Rest and Digest” = SLUDD i.e. Decreased HR, Non Sweating, Decreased BP, Decreased RR, Pupil Constriction, INCREASED GI movement. S = Salivation
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 55

intro to the nervous system lecture - Introduction to the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online