lecture_11-meteorites (1)

lecture_11-meteorites (1) - Announcements MIDTERM next...

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Announcements MIDTERM --- next Thursday. Midterm review sheet posted Review session --- Tuesday, Nov. 1 st 4:00-6:00 in Young CS76. New syllabus posted (check for readings) Quiz #6 due before class next Tuesday. Field trip sign up --- after class, $5 deposit
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Lecture 11: Meteorites- messengers from the Solar Nebula Accretion of Jupiter Meteorites and the nature of asteroids Differentiation of planetary materials Radioactivity, CAIs, and the age of the Solar System Our goals today: a cut, polished slab of the Vigarano meteorite a carbonaceous chondrite
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What have we learned? Where did the solar system come from? Galactic recycling built the elements from which planets formed. We can observe stars forming in other gas clouds. What caused the orderly patterns of motion in our solar system? The solar nebula spun faster as it contracted because of conservation of angular momentum. Collisions between gas particles then caused the nebula to flatten into a disk. The central region heated up due to collisions (pressure). We can observe similar disks around currently forming stars (which may form planets).
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What do we think the composition of the solar nebula was? 1 2 3 4% 3% 93% 1. About half hydrogen and helium, half heavier elements (oxygen, carbon, silicon, iron, magnesium, etc.) 2. About 98% hydrogen and helium, and 2% heavier elements 3. less hydrogen and helium, more heavier elements
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Accretion within the solar nebula formed larger and larger bodies that eventually became planetesimals, with sizes up to a few kilometers across. In the inner, hotter part of the solar nebula, planetesimals were composed mostly of silicates and metals. In the outer, cooler portion of the nebula, water ice was the dominant component.
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Accretion of the terrestrial planets Grains - planetesimals Planetary embryos --- era of violent collisions Final accretion --- dissipation of the nebula “run - away growth”
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Terrestrial Planets of the Inner Solar System Planetary sized objects melt, differentiate, and lose most of their volatiles (gases and ices).
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