multivariable_16_Vector_Calculus_2up

multivariable_16_Vector_Calculus_2up - 16 Vector Calculus...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 16 Vector Calculus 6eF ied This chapter is concerned with applying calculus in the context of vector fields . A two-dimensional vector field is a function f that maps each point ( x,y ) in R 2 to a two- dimensional vector ( u,v ) , and similarly a three-dimensional vector field maps ( x,y,z ) to ( u,v,w ) . Since a vector has no position, we typically indicate a vector field in graphical form by placing the vector f ( x,y ) with its tail at ( x,y ). Figure 16.1 shows a representation of the vector field f ( x,y ) = ( x/ radicalbig x 2 + y 2 + 4 , y/ radicalbig x 2 + y 2 + 4 ) . For such a graph to be readable, the vectors must be fairly short, which is accomplished by using a different scale for the vectors than for the axes. Such graphs are thus useful for understanding the sizes of the vectors relative to each other but not their absolute size. Vector fields have many important applications, as they can be used to represent many physical quantities: the vector at a point may represent the strength of some force (gravity, electricity, magnetism) or a velocity (wind speed or the velocity of some other fluid). We have already seen a particularly important kind of vector fieldthe gradient. Given a function f ( x,y ), recall that the gradient is ( f x ( x,y ) ,f y ( x,y ) ) , a vector that depends on (is a function of) x and y . We usually picture the gradient vector with its tail at ( x,y ), pointing in the direction of maximum increase. Vector fields that are gradients have some particularly nice properties, as we will see. An important example is F = (bigg x ( x 2 + y 2 + z 2 ) 3 / 2 , y ( x 2 + y 2 + z 2 ) 3 / 2 , z ( x 2 + y 2 + z 2 ) 3 / 2 )bigg , 389 390 Chapter 16 Vector Calculus-1.6-1.8-2.0 1.6 0.0-1.2 2.0 y 2.0 1.2 1.0 1.2-1.2-1.0-0.8 0.4 0.6-0.4-0.2 x-0.8 0.8 1.8 0.2-1.6 1.6 0.0 1.4-2.0-0.6-1.4-0.4 0.8 0.4 Figure 16.1 A vector field. which points from the point ( x,y,z ) toward the origin and has length radicalbig x 2 + y 2 + z 2 ( x 2 + y 2 + z 2 ) 3 / 2 = 1 ( radicalbig x 2 + y 2 + z 2 ) 2 , which is the reciprocal of the square of the distance from ( x,y,z ) to the originin other words, F is an inverse square law. The vector F is a gradient: F = 1 radicalbig x 2 + y 2 + z 2 , (16 . 1) which turns out to be extremely useful. Exercises 16.1. Sketch the vector fields; check your work with Sages plot_vector_field function. 1. ( x, y ) 2. ( x, y ) 3. ( x, y ) 4. ( sin x, cos y ) 5. ( y, 1 /x ) 6. ( x + 1 , x + 3 ) 7. Verify equation 16.1. 16.2 Line Integrals 391 6i eega We have so far integrated over intervals, areas, and volumes with single, double, and triple integrals. We now investigate integration over or along a curveline integrals are really curve integrals....
View Full Document

Page1 / 18

multivariable_16_Vector_Calculus_2up - 16 Vector Calculus...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online