acquisitions

acquisitions - 1 1 ACQUISITIONS AND TAKEOVERS When...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 1 ACQUISITIONS AND TAKEOVERS When analyzing investment decisions, we did not consider in any detail the largest investment decisions that most firms make, i.e., their acquisitions of other firms. Boeings largest investment of the last decade was not a new commercial aircraft but its acquisition of McDonnell Douglas in 1996. At the time of the acquisition, Boeing's managers were optimistic about the merger, claiming that it would create substantial value for the stockholders of both firms. What are the principles that govern acquisitions? Should they be judged differently from other investments? Firms are acquired for a number of reasons. In the 1960s and 1970s, firms such as Gulf and Western and ITT built themselves into conglomerates by acquiring firms in other lines of business. In the 1980s, corporate giants like Time, Beatrice and RJR Nabisco were acquired by other firms, their own management or wealthy raiders, who saw potential value in restructuring or breaking up these firms. In the 1990s, we saw a wave of consolidation in the media business as telecommunications firms acquired entertainment firms, and entertainment firms acquired cable businesses. Through time, firms have also acquired or merged with other firms to gain the benefits of synergy, in the form of either higher growth, as in the Disney acquisition of Capital Cities, or lower costs. Acquisitions seem to offer firms a short cut to their strategic objectives, but the process has its costs. In this chapter, we examine the four basic steps in an acquisition, starting with establishing an acquisition motive, continuing with the identification and valuation of a target firm, and following up with structuring and paying for the deal. The final, and often the most difficult, step is making the acquisition work after the deal is consummated. Background on Acquisitions When we talk about acquisitions or takeovers, we are talking about a number of different transactions. These transactions can range from one firm merging with another 2 2 firm to create a new firm to managers of a firm acquiring the firm from its stockholders and creating a private firm. We begin this section by looking at the different forms taken by acquisitions, continue the section by providing an overview on the acquisition process and conclude by examining the history of the acquisitions in the United States Classifying Acquisitions There are several ways in which a firm can be acquired by another firm. In a merger , the boards of directors of two firms agree to combine and seek stockholder approval for the combination. In most cases, at least 50% of the shareholders of the target and the bidding firm have to agree to the merger. The target firm ceases to exist and becomes part of the acquiring firm; Digital Computers was absorbed by Compaq after it was acquired in 1997. In a consolidation , a new firm is created after the merger, and both the acquiring firm and target firm stockholders receive stock in this firm; Citigroup, for...
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acquisitions - 1 1 ACQUISITIONS AND TAKEOVERS When...

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