2-1 Conditional Statements

2-1 Conditional - obtuse.” Inverse ~p ~q An inverse statement can be formed by negating both the hypothesis and conclusion If it is an apple then

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Conditional Statements Section 2-1
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Conditional Statements If-then statements are called conditional statements. The portion of the sentence following if is called the hypothesis. The part following then is called the conclusion. p q (If p, then q)
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If it is an apple , then it is a fruit . Hypothesis – It is an apple. Conclusion – It is a fruit. A conditional can have a truth value of true or false. p q
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Using a Venn Diagram to illustrate a conditional Illinois Residents Chicago Residents If you live in Chicago, then you live in Illinois.
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Converse q p The converse statement is formed by switching the hypothesis and conclusion. If it is an apple, then it is a fruit. Converse: If it is a fruit, then it is an apple. The converse may be true or false.
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negation – the denial of a statement Ex. “An angle is obtuse.” Negation – “An angle is not
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Unformatted text preview: obtuse.” Inverse ~p ~q An inverse statement can be formed by negating both the hypothesis and conclusion. If it is an apple, then it is a fruit. Inverse: If it is not an apple, then it is not a fruit. The inverse may be true or false. Contrapositive ~q ~p A contrapositive is formed by negating the hypothesis and conclusion of the converse. If it is an apple, then it is a fruit. Contrapositive : If it is not a fruit, then it is not an apple. The contrapositive of a true conditional is true and of a false conditional is false. Joke Time • Why was Cinderella thrown off the baseball team? • Because she ran away from the ball! • What did Cinderella say when the snapshots she’d taken didn’t arrive? • Someday my prints will come!...
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This note was uploaded on 12/01/2011 for the course MATH 105 taught by Professor Towns during the Fall '10 term at BYU.

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2-1 Conditional - obtuse.” Inverse ~p ~q An inverse statement can be formed by negating both the hypothesis and conclusion If it is an apple then

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