Lecture9 - Campaign Finance-student

Lecture9 - Campaign Finance-student -...

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Matisoff – POL 1101
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Americans vote for candidates Israel, Netherlands, candidate names don’t even appear on ballot Party role weakening in American politics 19th century – candidates chosen in “smoke-filled rooms” by party leaders
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Congressional Elections (1932-2000) House generally controlled by Democrats (83% of the time) Presidency more contested (Republicans = 44.5% of the time) Winner gets less than 55% of vote In house races incumbent wins most of the time Usually with >60% of the vote Fewer people vote in congressional elections during non-presidential elections Congress can do things president does not Take credit for local funding
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1. Get “mentioned” as one of “presidential caliber” Off the record remarks Travel the country making speeches Have a famous name Get identified with major piece of legislation Be a governor of a big state, esp NY 2. Set aside time to run, especially if you are only mentioned, and not well known Reagan spent 6+ years running Mondale spent 4 years campaigning Modern candidates tend to hold office while running 3. Have a military or governor background / be a war hero Eisenhower; Bush I, Bush II, Clinton, Reagan, Carter, FDR Congress is less likely (JFK, Obama) Be a VP after being in Congress (Ford; Nixon; LBJ; Truman) 4. Raise Money, form a PAC 5. Form an organization Have policy positions Knock on doors, make telephone calls, organize receptions / meetings
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How to become a congressional candidate 1. You will not likely win. Incumbents have won 90%
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course MATHEMATIC Math 101 taught by Professor Davis during the Spring '10 term at Central GA Tech.

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Lecture9 - Campaign Finance-student -...

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