Lecture11 - Congress-student

Lecture11 - Congress-student - Congress Lecture12POL1101...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Congress Lecture 12 – POL 1101 Dr. Daniel Matisoff
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Great Compromise (again) Distributing the power between large states & small states through bicameral legislature Senators elected by state legislature; 1/3 at a time; every 2 years 17th amendment, 1913, direct election of Senate Highly contentious – Senate didn’t want change House of Representatives apportioned via census; “reapportionment” 435 members
Background image of page 2
Powers of the House Power of impeachment Originate revenue bills (shared in practice)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Powers of Senate Trial, in case of impeachment (2/3 for conviction) Andrew Johnson Nixon Clinton Constitution vs. Reality Treaties (2/3 vote)
Background image of page 4
Congressional Checks and Balances Budgeting Senators often suggest nominations for districts Size of Supreme Court Treaty ratification Congressional Oversight Committees Impeachment Lawmaking
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Congress vs. Parliament Congress “coming together” vs. Parliament – Parler “to talk” Parliament – National party Congress – individual representatives, representing districts Parliament – keeps party in line; less so in Congress (more unity with Republicans) Separation of executive leads to more powerful Congress; more “stable” government Congress has staff, salary, office, research capacity, travel budget, computer services, etc; parliament has little pay, no staff, tiny budgets
Background image of page 6
The Filibuster Prevent “cloture” by talking an issue to death 1917 Wilson had foreign policy measure talked to death by “11 willful men” Rule 22: 2/3 of senate can cut off debate 1950s – 60s: used to stop civil rights legislation 1957 Strom Thurmond filibustered for over 24 hours 1964 civil rights act legislation filibustered by Southern Democrats for over 75 hours “Tracking system” allowed other business to go on 1970s – revised rule to allow cloture with 60 votes Shift away from actual filibusters to “threatened”
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
112 filibusters by end of 110th Congress! Some 40+ in 111th, on pace for 2nd most in history
Background image of page 8
Why has the use of filibusters increased? “Because Democrats are pussies” – Stephen Colbert
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/29/2011 for the course MATHEMATIC Math 101 taught by Professor Davis during the Spring '10 term at Central GA Tech.

Page1 / 29

Lecture11 - Congress-student - Congress Lecture12POL1101...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online