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lecture27 - Phys 2101 Gabriela Gonzlez 2 3 Ideal heat...

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Unformatted text preview: Phys 2101 Gabriela Gonzlez 2 3 Ideal heat engines use a cycle of reversible thermodynamic processes. A heat engine transforms energy extracted as heat from thermal reservoirs, into mechanical work. Consider a Carnot engine: a cycle with two isothermal processes at a high temperature T H (a b) and and a low temperature T L (c d), and two adiabatic processes (b c, d a). E int = 0 = Q W W = Q = |Q H |-|Q L | > 0 Ideally, S = 0 = |Q H |/T H- |Q L |/T L http://galileoandeinstein.physics.virginia.edu/more_stuff/flashlets/carnot.htm 4 We use the heat Q H to get work W done, so efficiency is defined as = |W|/|Q H | For a Carnot engine, W = |Q H |-|Q L | |Q H |/T H = |Q L |/T L so C = (|Q H |-|Q L |)/ |Q H | = 1- |Q L |/|Q H | = 1- T L /T H < 1 Carnots theorem: The most efficient cycle with maximum temperature T H and minimum temperature T L , is the Carnot cycle. 5 Three ideal Carnot engines operate between (a) 400K and 500K, (b) 500K and 600K, and (c) 400K and 600K. (c) 400K and 600K....
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This note was uploaded on 12/01/2011 for the course PHYS 2001 taught by Professor Sprunger during the Fall '08 term at LSU.

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lecture27 - Phys 2101 Gabriela Gonzlez 2 3 Ideal heat...

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