peissig_tarr_obj_rec_07

peissig_tarr_obj_rec_07 - Visual Object Recognition: Do We...

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Unformatted text preview: Visual Object Recognition: Do We Know More Now Than We Did 20 Years Ago? Jessie J. Peissig and Michael J. Tarr Department of Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912; email: jpeissig@fullerton.edu, Michael tarr@brown.edu Annu. Rev. Psychol. 2007. 58:7596 First published online as a Review in Advance on August 11, 2006 The Annual Review of Psychology is online at http://psych.annualreviews.org This articles doi: 10.1146/annurev.psych.58.102904.190114 Copyright c 2007 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved 0066-4308/07/0110-0075$20.00 Key Words structural descriptions, view-based, neural codes, visual features, category-selectivity Abstract We review the progress made in the field of object recognition over the past two decades. Structural-description models, making their appearance in the early 1980s, inspired a wealth of empirical re- search. Moving to the 1990s, psychophysical evidence for view-based accounts of recognition challenged some of the fundamental assump- tions of structural-description theories. The 1990s also saw increased interest in the neurophysiological study of high-level visual cortex, the results of which provide some constraints on how objects may be represented. By 2000, neuroimaging arose as a viable means for con- necting neurons to behavior. One of the most striking fMRI results has been category selectivity, which provided further constraints for models of object recognition. Despite this progress, the field is still faced with the challenge of developing a comprehensive theory that integrates this ever-increasing body of results and explains how we perceive and recognize objects. 75 A n n u . R e v . P s y c h o l . 2 7 . 5 8 : 7 5- 9 6 . D o w n l o a d e d f r o m a r j o u r n a l s . a n n u a l r e v i e w s . o r g b y U N I V E R S I T Y O F F L O R I D A o n 8 / 2 2 / 7 . F o r p e r s o n a l u s e o n l y . Contents INTRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 CIRCA 1985STRUCTURAL DESCRIPTION MODELS . . . . . . 77 So Where are We? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 CIRCA 1990VIEW-BASED MODELS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 CIRCA 1995WHATS HAPPENING IN THE BRAIN? . 81 CIRCA 1890/1990 NEUROPSYCHOLOGY REDUX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 CIRCA 2000THE RISE OF A NEW MACHINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 CIRCA 2006TOO MUCH DATA/TOO FEW MODELS . . . . 91 INTRODUCTION At a functional level, visual object recognition is at the center of understanding how we think about what we see. Object identification is a primary end state of visual processing and a critical precursor to interacting with and rea- soning about the world. Thus, the question of how we recognize objects is both perceptual and cognitive, tying together what are often treated as separate disciplines. At the outset, we should state that in spite of the best ef- forts of many to understand this process, we believe that the field still has a long way to...
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This note was uploaded on 12/01/2011 for the course CLP 7934 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at University of Florida.

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peissig_tarr_obj_rec_07 - Visual Object Recognition: Do We...

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