GB Ch 7 Readings on Stanford Experiment (page 4)

GB Ch 7 Readings on Stanford Experiment (page 4) - Brady...

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Brady and Logsdon on Business Ethics 4 Context of Zimbardo's "Stanford Prison Experiment" During the summer of 1971, Zimbardo, Haney, and Banks conducted an experiment in social psychology at Stanford University which has come to be known as the "Stanford Prison Experiment" or the Zimbardo experiment. Similar to Milgram's (1963) electric shock experiments, the purpose of Zimbardo's research was to investigate the influence of situational factors on behavior. The deplorable condition of the country's penal system and its failure to rehabilitate prisoners are sometimes explained in terms of what Zimbardo calls the "dispositional hypothesis." That is, a major cause of the dehumanization, brutality, and generally poor conditions within prisons can be charged to some innate psychological characteristics of the correctional and inmate populations. The purpose of the Stanford Prison Experiment was to test this hypothesis by placing "normal-average" persons in a simulated prison and observing the results. If the behavior of normal persons conformed closely to
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This note was uploaded on 12/02/2011 for the course GEN BUS 201 taught by Professor Susanpark during the Fall '11 term at Boise State.

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GB Ch 7 Readings on Stanford Experiment (page 4) - Brady...

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