03_1d - Lesson 3: 1-D Conservation of Momentum We can...

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Lesson 3: 1-D Conservation of Momentum We can measure the momentum of any number of objects before and after they have a collision. A collision is when two or more objects strike each other, and exert a relatively large force during a relatively short period of time. This force acting during a time period results in impulse. For now we will only look at how to figure out problems with two objects in a head-on collision, called either 1 dimensional or linear collisions. The objects must move in a straight line. .. they can not move off at any sort of angle. It was noticed in Newton’s time that the total momentum of all objects before a collision equals the total momentum of all objects after . This is true if the objects are acting in an isolated system (nothing entering or leaving) and there are no external forces acting on the objects. To this day the Conservation of Momentum remains a fundamental law of physics. Like all conservation laws, it essentially means whatever you started with you still
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This note was uploaded on 12/02/2011 for the course PHYSICS 235 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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03_1d - Lesson 3: 1-D Conservation of Momentum We can...

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