11_fieldlines - Lesson 11 Field Lines An electric field is...

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Lesson 11: Field Lines An electric field is a vector, so we can represent it using vector diagrams. The electric field will show up as arrows drawn at various points around charged objects. These electric field lines (sometimes also called lines of force ) are drawn below for two simple examples. Notice that the lines are drawn to show the direction of the force, due to the electric field, as it would act on a positive test charge. Also, the closer you get to the charge, the closer the lines are to each other. This symbolizes how the electric field gets stronger as you go closer to the source. If you pick a spot further out, you’ll see that the lines aren’t as dense there… so the field is weaker. If a positive and negative charge are close enough, their field lines can interact. The arrows go from the positive charge to the negative charge (in exactly the same direction we would expect a positive test charge to move). The direction of the field at any point is the tangent drawn to the field line at that point.
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11_fieldlines - Lesson 11 Field Lines An electric field is...

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