13i_rc_circuits

13i_rc_circuits - Lesson 13i RC Circuits If you have a...

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Lesson 13i: RC Circuits If you have a circuit with both resistors and capacitors, you call it (not surprisingly) a RC circuit . Because of the capacitor, the circuit will behave in a particular way. At first, with the capacitor uncharged , DC current will flow through it without any problem. This means that we can just do calculations based on the resistors as if the capacitor was not even there. You can go ahead and use formulas like V = IR. Over a period of time, the voltage across the capacitor will cause it to build up charge. As this happens the amount of current passing through the capacitor will decrease. Eventually the capacitor will be fully charged, with the same voltage as the battery. Now, no current will flow through the circuit. You can figure out how much charge is stored using Q = CV. When we reach the point when the capacitor is fully charged (after the circuit has been turned on for a while), we can say that the circuit is showing steady-state behavior. Once a circuit is steady-state, you may need to figure out a few things about the capacitors (remember,
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13i_rc_circuits - Lesson 13i RC Circuits If you have a...

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