15_magfields - Lesson 15: Magnetic Fields We can imagine a...

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Lesson 15: Magnetic Fields We can imagine a magnetic field surrounding a magnet in much the same way that we did for electrical charges. One of the biggest differences is that electrical charges can be isolated from each other (a negative charge can be sitting all alone), while magnetic poles must come in pairs (north and south). So when you draw diagrams of magnetic fields, they will more closely resemble the kinds of diagrams we did with multiple electric charges and parallel plates. We will continue to use the concept of “field” to explain how one magnet can exert a force on another magnet by an interaction between magnetic fields. This is action at a distance, like gravity and electric charges. At this point it would be valuable to compare the three kinds of fields we have examined in Physics 20 and 30. Since they are all fields they all share similarities, but they are not the same. You should be able to discuss these similarities and differences. Magnetic Fields Gravitational Fields Electric Fields Strong field. Weakest of all fields. Strong field. Not directly calculated in Physics 30 (although we do measure it indirectly). Calculated using an inverse square law ( Newton's Universal Law of Gravitation ). Calculated using an inverse square law ( Coulomb's Law ). Attraction or Repulsion. Always attraction. Attraction or Repulsion. Directly related to the magnet
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This note was uploaded on 12/02/2011 for the course PHYSICS 235 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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15_magfields - Lesson 15: Magnetic Fields We can imagine a...

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