28_tir_prisms - Lesson 28: Total Internal Reflection &...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
There are two topics that we should look at that are consequences of refraction: Total Internal Reflection Prisms Total Internal Reflection I know that it might seem like a typo, but total internal reflection is happening because of refraction . If a beam of light is traveling from an optically dense medium into a less dense medium, the light can refract so much that it actually gets trapped in the original medium (like it was reflected). Let’s look at what happens to the refracted angle as we increase the incident angle slowly for a ray leaving a more optically dense medium into a less optically dense medium. In these examples we will refer to the light rays by colors. This has nothing to do with the color of light being used. It's just to keep straight which diagram is referring to which situation. Red Ray Notice that the red beam in Illustration 1 does exactly what we would expect it to do. It leaves the water and bends away from the normal. If we wanted to calculate anything for this situation, we would do a normal calculation using Snell's Law. There is nothing at all special about this first ray. Blue Ray We’ve increased the angle that the blue beam is traveling through the water in Illustration 2 . This means that the beam leaves the water and travels into the air refracted at a bigger angle away from the normal. Notice that the beam traveling in the air is getting
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/02/2011 for the course PHYSICS 235 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 4

28_tir_prisms - Lesson 28: Total Internal Reflection &...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online