9-18-08[lecture6]jl

9-18-08[lecture6]jl - o In/dependent variables are...

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Chem 116 Lecture 6 [JL] 9 18 08 Water has abnormal liquid solid transition. o At same T, as you increase p, substance changes from solid to liquid. ± To picture a normal substance, think of golf balls scattered in a box. As you apply pressure to it, those unorganized golf balls will settle in more organized form, and therefore result in higher density. But water has the opposite behavior from a normal substance. As pressure is increased, (at the same temperature) water will become less dense. ± e.g. Ice skating: Pressure is increased by very thin blade of skate => ice turns into water. Difference between phase diagram and heating curve.
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Unformatted text preview: o In/dependent variables are different. Phase diagram: T=independent variable, P=dependent variable. Heating curve: Heat=independent variable, T=dependent variable. As solid changes into liquid, point in phase diagram will not change but point in heat curve will. (A) incorrect because this is heating curve. (B) At 3 atm, CO 2 only has one phase change (Gas Solid). Look phase diagram of CO2 above. This would have been a right answer if question was asking for a cooling curve at above the triple point. Therefore, (C) is right answer. heat energy removed heat energy removed heat energy removed...
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9-18-08[lecture6]jl - o In/dependent variables are...

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