10-16-08[lecture13]si

10-16-08[lecture13]si - Chem 116 Lecture 13 10/16/08 (SI)...

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Chem 116 Lecture 13 10/16/08 (SI) Kinetics Study of rates of chemical reactions Today’s agenda Modeling of kinetics at particle level Collision theory Arrhenius Equation/ prediction of temperature dependence /k Reaction mechanisms The use of experimental data to determine rate laws: Special case by case analysis/ first order rate laws Completing the table Half life This is the amount of time it takes for a half of the reactant to disappear (or react) There are two ways of doing this: via a mathematical equation or graphically. The mathematical equation is; [A] t is a function of t For a first order reaction [A] t is given by ln [A] t = ln [A] 0 - kt Half life is the value of t when [A] t = ½[A] 0 A half life graph could be plotted as concentration against time, but that isn’t linear. What is linear (straight line with negative slope) is ln [A] t against time There are two general equations for half life if the reaction is a first order: 1) integrated rate law and 2) the differential rate law. Integrated rate law:
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This note was uploaded on 12/02/2011 for the course PHYSICS 235 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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10-16-08[lecture13]si - Chem 116 Lecture 13 10/16/08 (SI)...

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