14_outline_mutate

14_outline_mutate - Mutations in bacteria Bio119 I....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Mutations in bacteria Bio119 I. Mutations: what are they? A. They are changes in the DNA sequence B. Can arise: C. Consequences of mutations in a haploid genome: D. If mutation is not repaired before next round of replication: E. Revision to wild-type is possible depending on the nature of the mutation II. Types of Mutations: A. Single base pair mutations (called a substitution or a point mutation) Page 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Mutations in bacteria Bio119 B. Frameshifts by insertion/deletion of a 1-2 bases Page 2
Background image of page 2
Mutations in bacteria Bio119 C. Insertions and deletions of larger DNA fragments 1. Gain or loss of 100-1000’s (or more) of bases 2. Results in complete loss of gene function 3. Some deletions might wipe out entire gene cluster 4. Translocation: 5. Inversion: Page 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Mutations in bacteria Bio119 6. Why/how does this happen? 7. Big deletions in most cases are not revertible. D. Caused by deliberate insertion of DNA segments like: E. Back mutations or reversions 1. Point mutations are usually reversible
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/03/2011 for the course BIO 118 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 8

14_outline_mutate - Mutations in bacteria Bio119 I....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online