Lecture 24

Lecture 24 - American Heritage November 21, 2011 November...

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Unformatted text preview: American Heritage November 21, 2011 November 21, 2011 HAPPY THANKSGIVING: No labs or Review Room hours the week of November 21st due to the holiday. Next lecture Monday, November 28th TRAVEL SAFE! Review Room is open to review the exam for the following times: Closed for Thanksgiving week! Monday, November 28th through Friday, December 2nd Objectives Reflect on America s obligations to the rest of the world. Discuss how arguments about virtue and self-interest affect our understandings of the propriety of war. Consider how the aftermath of war affects politics and society. The New Deal s Legacy Reduced Human suffering But by itself, did not end the Great Depression Nor was it the only reason for the growth of government War and the Growth of Government World War I Government grew 250% between 1912 and 1924 World War II Government grew more than 300% between 1938 and 1948 Military Spending as % of GDP U.S. 4.1% France 2.6% U.K. 2.4% Germany 1.5% Japan .8% Most recent US defense budget: $500 billion Relationship with the World Should foreign policy be based on self- interest or a sense of public virtue? Spread democracy? Protect our national interests? Power, Liberty, and Foreign Policy Government Power Protect Liberty and Enhance Freedom Project Power Inward Project Power Outward Tradition of Isolationism America s historic impulse was to avoid the rest of the world. Tis our true policy to steer clear of permanent Alliances, with any portion of the foreign world. . . We may safely trust to temporary alliances for extraordinary emergencies. (Washington s Farewell Address) honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none (Jefferson s First Inaugural) Dominant US position until WW1 Charles Lindbergh and...
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Lecture 24 - American Heritage November 21, 2011 November...

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