Lecture 25

Lecture 25 - American Heritage November 28, 2011 November...

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Unformatted text preview: American Heritage November 28, 2011 November 28, 2011 Student Ratings need to be done by Sunday, December 11th. Please take the time to complete. It is very helpful to get the students input. Final Exam will be in the testing center December 12th -15th (full days) Please note that the exam is NOT offered on the last day of finals! Also, there are NO exceptions if a student misses the exam. Objectives • Review major occurrences in the Civil Rights movement and its importance for America. • Compare developments in human freedom across American history. Gap Between Ideals and Practice • What does equality mean? • Equal protection of the laws? • Equality of opportunity? • Is there a difference between social and legal equality? Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) • Louisiana enacted a law requiring separate railway cars for blacks and whites • 1892 – Homer Adolph Plessy took a seat in the “ whites only ” car. He was arrested when he refused to move. 14 th Amendment “ No state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States, nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. ” Is the Louisiana Law a Violation of the 14 th Amendment? Majority Opinion • Laws enforcing the separation of the races do not deprive anyone of property or deny the equal protection of the laws • There is a difference between political equality and social equality • Social equality cannot be forced • “ Legislation is powerless to eradicate racial instincts, or to abolish distinctions based upon physical differences…. If one race be inferior to the other socially, the constitution of the United States cannot put them upon the same plane. ” John Marshall Harlan ’ s Famous Dissent • The majority decision allows for impermissible restrictions on personal freedom. • The Constitution and Equality • “ Our constitution is color-blind, and neither knows nor tolerates classes among citizens. In respect of civil rights, all citizens are equal before the law. The humblest is the peer of the most powerful. The law regards man as man, and takes no account of his surroundings or of his color…....
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This note was uploaded on 12/03/2011 for the course AHTG 105 taught by Professor Kellypaterson during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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Lecture 25 - American Heritage November 28, 2011 November...

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