EfficientNoteTaking

EfficientNoteTaking - E fficient Note Taking from the...

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1 One of the most important skills a college student needs to learn is how to take effective notes during classroom lectures and discussions; for those students who prefer to take notes based on their textbook chapter readings, note-taking skills are valuable. This packet has four purposes: (1) to instruct students in the Cornell system of note taking; (2) to demonstrate the three-stage process of note-taking; (3) to increase your Efficient Note Taking from the Augsburg College Academic Skills Center
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2 knowledge of the general principles of note-taking, and (4) to give sample lectures for students to practice on. I. THE CORNELL SYSTEM OF NOTE TAKING SO MANY STUDENTS TEND TO VIEW NOTE-TAKING OF CLASSROOM LECTURES AS A ONE-STEP PROCESS; THAT IS, IT ONLY INVOLVES TAKING LECTURE NOTES WHILE THE PROFESSOR IS SPEAKING! THIS IS A MISTAKE, FOR NOTE-TAKING IS ACTUALLY A THREE-STEP PROCESS, AND EACH STEP IS NECESSARY IN ORDER FOR YOU TO BE AN EFFICIENT NOTE-TAKER! STEP ONE: Preparing the System 1. Use a large, loose-leaf notebook. The large size allows you to develop meaningful notes, record examples, and draw diagrams. The loose-leaf feature enables you to insert mimeographed handouts and assignment sheets in topical or chronological order. It also enables you to redo sheets and easily replace them. 2. Draw a vertical line about two and one-half inches from the left edge of each sheet. The narrower column is the recall column. Classroom notes will be written to the right of the line. Key words and phrases will be written to the left of the line. College bookstores also sell this type of loose-leaf paper. STEP TWO: During the Lecture 1. Take notes on one side of the page only. Later, while studying, it is a great help to spread out the pages so as to see the pattern of the lecture and to make additional comments of your own on the reverse sides. 2. Record your notes in simple paragraph form. Your object should be to make your notes complete and clear enough so that they will have meaning for you weeks and months later.
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3 3. Do not outline, as it adds additional frustration. (However, outline if the instructor places his outline on the board or on an overhead). Concentrate getting the main idea and major details together in one paragraph rather than trying to force the professor's lecture into outline format. 4. Skip lines to show the end of one main idea and the start of another. Indicate major details with numbers or letters following the main idea. 5. Use abbreviations to give yourself extra time to listen and to write (for example, write "E free = restrict what we spend, earn” instead of “Economic Freedom is defined as those restrictions upon what we spend, etc.” Make up abbreviations for words and phrases frequently used. Make a key of abbreviations at the front of the appropriate section of your
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This note was uploaded on 12/02/2011 for the course AR 107 taught by Professor Gracegraham during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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EfficientNoteTaking - E fficient Note Taking from the...

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