Introduction to Motion in Two and Three Dimensions

Introduction to Motion in Two and Three Dimensions - a(t)...

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Introduction to Motion in Two and Three Dimensions Most real-world kinematics problems involve the motion of objects in two and three dimensions. Fortunately, most of the equations we derived in the previous can be easily generalized to the two and three dimensional cases. The prescription for doing this is simple: instead of treating x(t) , v(t) , and
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Unformatted text preview: a(t) as scalar-valued functions for position, velocity, and acceleration, we will reinterpret these functions as being vector-valued. In other words, instead of the value of x(t) at a particular point in time being a number (or scalar), the value of the function at that point will be a vector...
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This note was uploaded on 12/03/2011 for the course PHYSICS 010 taught by Professor - during the Fall '09 term at Montgomery.

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