Introduction to Vectors

Introduction to Vectors - On a two-dimensional plane, for...

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Introduction to Vectors In order to represent physical quantities such as position and momentum in more than one dimension, we must introduce new mathematical objects called vectors. A vector is defined as an element of a vector space, but since we will only be dealing with very special types of vector spaces (namely, two- and three-dimensional Euclidean space) we can be more specific. For our purposes, a vector is either an ordered pair or triplet of numbers.
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Unformatted text preview: On a two-dimensional plane, for instance, any point (a, b) is a vector. Graphically, we often represent such a vector by drawing an arrow from the origin to the point, with the tip of the arrow resting at the point. The situation for three-dimensional vectors is very much the same, with an ordered triplet (a, b, c) being represented by an arrow from the origin to the corresponding point in three-dimensional space. The vector (a, b) in the Euclidean plane....
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This note was uploaded on 12/03/2011 for the course PHYSICS 010 taught by Professor - during the Fall '09 term at Montgomery.

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Introduction to Vectors - On a two-dimensional plane, for...

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