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MIT1_201JF08_lec07

MIT1_201JF08_lec07 - PUBLIC TRANSPORT INTRODUCTION AND...

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John Attanucci 1.201, Lecture 7 Fall 2008 1 PUBLIC TRANSPORT INTRODUCTION AND ORGANIZATIONAL MODELS: THE ROLES OF THE PUBLIC and PRIVATE SECTORS Outline Current U.S. Status and Recent Trends Significant Influences A Critical Assessment Arguments Supporting Public Transport Organizational Models US Transit Industry UK Bus Industry Experience John Attanucci 1.201, Lecture 7 Fall 2008 2 Current Status Ridership increasing modestly but remains small Strong financial support from all levels of government Significant growth in number of new rail starts in past 25 years Major rebuilding of many older systems over past 15 years Little institutional or technological innovation, but growing recognition that fundamental change may be necessary for survival well into 21st century
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US Urban Transport Today Trends in Modal Split for Daily Travel in the United States (1969-2001) Mode of Transportation 1969 1977 1983 1990 1995 2001 Auto 81.8 83.7 82.0 87.1 86.5 86.4 Transit 3.2 2.6 2.2 2.0 1.8 1.6 Walk n/a 9.3 8.5 7.2 5.4 8.6 Bicycle n/a 0.7 0.8 0.7 0.9 0.9 Other 5.0 3.7 6.5 3.0 5.4 2.5 Source: Socioeconomics of Urban Travel: Evidence from the 2001 NHTS by John Pucher and John L. Renne. Transportation Quarterly, Vol. 57, No. 3, Summer 2003 (49–77). Eno Transportation Foundation, Inc., Washington, DC. Federal Highway Administration, Nationwide Personal Transportation Surveys 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990, and 1995; and National Household Travel Survey, 2001. John Attanucci 1.201, Lecture 7 3 Fall 2008 Transit Share of Commute for Metropolitan Areas Over 2 Million in Population (2000) Sources: U.S. 2000 Census Journey to Work ( http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/c2kbr-33.pdf ) and U.S. Department of Transportation Census Transportation Planning Package http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/ctpp/jtw/ John Attanucci 1.201, Lecture 7 4 Fall 2008
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Metropolitan Areas with Largest Transit Share Modal Split for Home-to-Work Journeys (2000) Car Transit Non-Motorized Work at home San Francisco - Oakland Chicago NY-NJ-CT-PA 81.0 81.5 65.7 9.5 11.5 24.9 5.5 4.2 6.4 4.1 2.9 3.0 Washington DC- Baltimore 83.2 9.4 3.9 3.5 Boston 82.7 9.0 5.1 3.2 ↑ ↓ indicates change of more than 0.5% from 1990-2000 Source: Journey to Work Trends in the United States and its Major Metropolitan Areas 1960-2000 John Attanucci 1.201, Lecture 7 5 Fall 2008 John Attanucci 1.201, Lecture 7 Fall 2008 6 Significant Influences Suburbanization of homes, employment and attractors Low costs for car ownership and operation Extensive urban road infrastructure Government policies towards roads and public transport
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7 Suburbanization: 2000 Journey to Work A. Total Trips (in millions of daily trips) 53.8 (52%) 49.0 (48%) Total Jobs 37.4 (36%) 9.2 (9%) 28.2 (27%) Central City 65.4 (64%) 44.6 (43%) 20.8 (20%) Suburbs Total Homes Suburbs Central City Homes in: Jobs in: B. Share of 1990-2000 Increase Jobs in: 65% 16% Suburbs 14% 5% Central City Suburbs Central City Homes in: C. Public Transport Mode Share John Attanucci 1.201, Lecture 7 Fall 2008 Jobs in: 2% 6% Suburbs 6% 14% Central City Suburbs Central City Homes in: John Attanucci 1.201, Lecture 7 Fall 2008 8 The Car-Road System* High car ownership levels 600 cars per 1000 population High car usage
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