Analyzing Controversial Issues

Analyzing Controversial Issues - Analyzing Controversial...

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Analyzing Controversial Issues Sociology 220 Prof. Pamela Oliver Library Lecture Next Tuesday September 21, 2004 Meet in Room 126 Memorial Library On research sources in ethnic studies Will tell you how to do the research for your debate brief Issues Is it appropriate to use race or ethnic profiling in policing and security enforcement? Should U.S. immigration law be changed to allow more workers from Mexico? Should English be the only language of instruction in U.S. public schools? Should race or ethnicity be taken into account in college admissions? Major Dimensions Interests: who stands to gain/lose Factual claims: assertions about reality Value claims: assertions about justice or morality Discourse: how language is used to persuade, to position the issue with respect to other issues or principles Sources We are looking for opinionated or “biased” sources, people who really advocate each side We want opinions from BOTH sides No “straw men” You are the judge or analyst weighing both sides fairly, NOT the lawyer advocating for one side You want to sort your sources into “sides” and notice what kinds of claims are being made on each side Library Lecture Sept 21 (Tuesday)
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Academic honesty No plagiarism. For how to avoid see: http://www.wisc.edu/writing/Handbook/QPA_plagiarism.html The penalty for academic dishonesty will range from F on the paper to F in the class (depending on extent of the offense) PLUS a letter to the Dean’s office describing the offense You will submit papers electronically, they will be checked through turnitin.com, plagiarism detection software Apologies to those of you who would not cheat, plus assurance that honesty will not be punished Interests Who stands to gain or lose? Money Jobs Political Power Prestige, sense of superiority People in common social locations have common or group interests People may disguise their interests under claims of general principles This may be entirely unconscious Discuss interests Easy concept for some, hard for others Policies ALWAYS affect people differently, depending upon their social location Simple student issues Plagiarism policy Course registration policies Interests as college students Interests: college admission policies Test scores vs. grades vs. class standing People who do well on tests (mostly highly educated English-speaking parents) More vs. less competitive high schools; weighted vs. unweighted GPA’s Non-academic factors Alumni preference, regional diversity, non-academic talents, service activities, ethnic-racial diversity Individual disadvantage vs. advantage
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People from advantaged backgrounds have an interest in ignoring the effect of background on achievement Do YOU expect to benefit/lose from each? Mexican Immigration: Interest Groups
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course SOCIOLOGY 220 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '10 term at Rutgers.

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Analyzing Controversial Issues - Analyzing Controversial...

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