Asian Americans - History Gan Xiang (Dialect of JiangXi...

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1 History Mandarin Central Asian Dialects Shanghainese Gan (Dialect of JiangXi provice) Xiang (dialect of HuNan) Mongolia Cantonese Southern Fujianese Tibetan (shanghai) Northern Fujianese Shanghainese (Hangzhou) Hakka Altaic family, with about 250 million speakers, includes Turkish and Mongolian. There is considerable controversy about this family. First, it is often classified with the Uralic languages (see above), which have a similar grammatic structures. Second, many linguists doubt that Korean, Japanese (125 million speakers), or Ainu should be included, or that these last three are even related to each other! Also represented here are the language isolates Gilyak and Ket.
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2 This family includes some 1000 different languages, spoken by about 250 million speakers. Malay and Indonesian (essentially the same language) account for about 140 million. Other examples include Madagascar in Africa, Tagalog in the Philippines, the aboriginal languages of Formosa (Taiwan) -- now almost displaced by Chinese -- and the many languages of the Pacific Islands, from Hawaiian in the north Pacific to Maori in New Zealand. ± A kingdom of Polynesian people, recognized as a nation by the US. ± 1830s-1890: Anglo-American planters take over much of the land, import many Asian workers ± Population becomes predominantly Asian • Chinese, Japanese, Pilipino • Ethnic, linguistic differences. • Whites an elite minority. ± “Pidgen” spoken. Class conflict predominates. ± Anglo-Americans overthrow the Kingdom of Hawaii (Queen Lydia Liliuokalani) in 1893 with US naval support, establish a “republic” in 1894 republic in 1894 ± Viewed as illegal at the time (then- president Cleveland denounced it). ± In 1898, US annexes. ± Annexation is a violation of international law, remains unresolved into 20th century ± Statehood 1959 to resolve legal status • Majority of Hawaiian population voted for statehood • Non-white character of the state an issue for many congressmen ± Hawaii to mainland migration: prior to 1965, many Asian Americans had roots in Hawaii
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3 Percent White 24 Black 2 Asian 42 (Japanese 17%, Filipino 14%, Chinese 5%) * Mixed generally includes Asian and/or native Pacific Islander 9 Native Hawaiian 7 Two Races* 13 Three Plus Races* 7 Other + AmInd 3 Hispanics of all races 7 Hawaiian, with or without white ± Asian majority, varying ethnicities (vary by island); the dominant group ± Native Hawaiians (some discrimination) ± Whites (Haoles) a minority, although relatively well off. • Portuguese not Haole, legacy of origins ± Pidgen ± Overt racial/ethnic name-calling coupled with more racial equality than in most of the US ± Those of native Hawaiian/Polynesian descents (pure + mixed) about 20% today ± Native Hawaiians claim discrimination. Do not want to be classified as “Asian,” as the “Asians” are dominant ± Significant native Hawaiian legal claims on public land ± Hawaiian independence movement is active, was invigorated by 100th anniversary of the takeover Discrimination and Exclusion ± Begins 1848s, with Gold Rush.
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course SOCIOLOGY 220 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '10 term at Rutgers.

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Asian Americans - History Gan Xiang (Dialect of JiangXi...

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