How_Plants_Help_Animals_Survive

How_Plants_Help_Animals_Survive - Lesson Plan Template...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Lesson Plan Template Name: Hannah Thomas, Brandi Date to be taught: 09/07/2011 Targeted Grades: (Circle or highlight one.) Spencer, Kristen Gautreaux K-2 @42 Content 8: Focus of Lesson: (Add the focus of the lesson after School: ' the subject area.) Language Arts: Math: Host Teacher: Science: How plants help animals survive Sociai Studies: Other: 5E Lesson Title: How plants help animals survive Louisiana GLE’s: 4‘“ grade- Life Science- Characteristics of Organisms o Predict and anticipate possible outcomes (SI-E-AZ) o Pose questions that can be answered by using students own observations, scientific knowledge, and testable scientific investigation (SI-E-A3) 0 Ask questions that can be answered by using students own observations, scientific knowledge, and testable scientific investigation (SL-EwAI) Student Learning Objectivels): TSW be able to identify major contributors to animal survival. TSW be able to accurately define key vocabulary words. TSW be able to successfully match animals with their plant counterpart. Key Vocabulary: 0 Evolution 0 Metabolism o Respiration o Pollination - Seed dispersal o Organism Material Needed: (List quantities. indicate whether quantities are per student or per group.) 0 For teacher — Book (Plant: Eyewitness Books) (Excerpts) — Questions to ask before lesson and during I Per Group (4-5 students) - An envelope filled with different animals - Index card for paragraph - PerStudent - Evaluation Quiz Lesson Context: This lesson is an introduction to how plants help Time Planned for this Lesson: 30-45 minutes animals survive in the wild. 5E Lesson Sequence: {Describe fully what students will do in each stage of your lesson. fnclude guiding questions you rnlght ask to help students. Please number your steps under each portion of the lesson plan.) Engage: From 8. B. Levin 8: S. Mercier, TED 6808, UNCG, Spring 2010, v3.1; Adapted based on P. Blanchard, EOC13125, LSU, Spring 2011 Based on Marzano, Pickering, & Pollack (2001), Hill & Flynn (2005}, and WIDA Standards [2007) Lesson Plan Template 1. Ask question to tap student's prior knowledge about plants and animals. 2. Read book to class to get them thinking about how plants help animals survive. Explore: 1. Divide students into small groups of about 5 people per group and hand out envelopes and index cards. 2. Have each group sort out their animais and plant counterparts with the matching statement. 3. Each group will chose one animal/plant subgroup and write a paragraph about how the plant heips the animal survive. 4. The teacher will talk about some of the key concepts of the game. Explain: 1. A member from each group wili then read aloud their card explaining what animal/plant combo they have and their relationship to each other. 2. This will ensure that each student get a full understanding of different plants and animals. 3. Each student will he handed a worksheet will a breakdown of all the key vocabulary terms and how it applies to the ecosystem. Elaborate: (Optional, if time allows.) The students will be allowed to waik around the room to see each groups different animal/plant combinations. Evaiuate: {Describe your evaluation plan. Also, attach an evaluation — use a separate page that you will hand out to students ~ln which you create 2 questions to assess what students learned in your lesmn. identify in parentheses at the end of each question which GLE you are assessing for your lesson.) A short quiz will be given to ensure that each student fully understands the concept discussed. Check for Success: EYes EN0 1. Does your lesson focus on and achieve the student learning objectives you listed? Wes [EN0 2. Did you attach your evaluation? ifiYes liNo 3. Did you attach any data sheets or worksheets? IfiYes JENo 4. Did you review the rubric that will be used to evaluate your lesson? Lesson Source: (Where did you get the idea for this lesson? Check one.) _ l/We created the whole lesson ourselves and did not “borrow” elements from other sources or the internet. _ i/We used the following resources to build our lesson: (Put the author/date/book name or the title of the Website and complete URL) From B. B. levln 8: S. Mercler, TED 6808, UNCG, Spring 2010, v3.1; Adapted based on P. Blanchard, EDCi 3125, ESU, Spring 2011 Based on Marzano, Pickering, 8: Pollack (2001}, Hill & Flynn (2006i, and “NBA Standards (2007] How Do Plants Help Animals Survive? Over millions of years, animals have evolved to become at least partially dependent upon plants. In most cases, this dependency involves the dissemination into the ecosystem of gases or nutrients instrumental to the process of respiration or metabolism. But in some extreme cases, plants and animals actually live together in a form of beneficial symbiosis. Evolution 0 Plants have become an integral part of the environment. They began to evolve approximately 500 million years ago and have attained functions such as the vascular system and reproduction by pollination. Animals, too, have evolved alongside plants, forming a tight relationship that has made one dependent upon the other. This relationship is similar to the way in which a human couple slowly integrates---merging their finances and their personal lives-"until they are so enmeshed that severing this connection would be a fractious event. Mafia; 0 The flow of energy in an ecosystem begins with organisms called producers, of which plants are included. Producers can manufacture their own food. Plants receive energy from the process of photosynthesis, which converts sunlight into the chemical energy of sugars and carbohydrates. Plants are then eaten by consumers such as herbivores and omnivores for energy, and depending on the particular ecosystem, the consumers may then be hunted and eaten by secondary consumers such as carnivores and other omnivores. This food chain cannot extend indefinitely, however, because only a fraction of the originally produced energy is captured by each subsequent organism. The rest is lost as heat. Respiration 0 All photosynthetic organisms use carbon dioxide in their metabolic process and produce oxygen as a byproduct. For other organisms that rely upon cellular respiration, the opposite is true: oxygen is used in the metabolic process, and carbon dioxide is released as a byproduct. Plant and animal processes complement each other. Pollination 0 Beneficial symbioses are prevalent between insects or birds and flowering plants. In exchange for sweet nectar, animals pick up pollen, usually without their knowledge or any effort, and deposit it throughout the environment. From a plant's perspective, it is usually better to rely upon animals for pollination than the wind. Some plants have evolved special structures—-—such as funnels—--in which pollen can only be accessed by a certain bill size of a hummingbird. Bright colors and unusual petals are helpful in attracting pollinators, who themselves often have evolved special structures to capture pollen or the perspicuous ability to assess the amount of sugar inside the nectar. Other Symbioses O The myrmecophyte is a plant that has a special organ in which ants live. This beneficial relationship allows the ant to defend the plant, and in return the plant offers the insect’s shelter. Some species of piper plants have a similar relationship, offering ants food in exchange for defense (which is also true for bullhom and whistling thorn acacias), and allowing their fruits to be distributed by bats and birds. Quiz 1. Which of the following describes how a living organism can help in the pollination of one type of flowering plant? (SL—E-AI) A. insects crawl from the stamens of the plant bringing pollen to pistils of another type of plant. B. burrowing mammals dig up the plants and leave them to root in a new place C. bees fly from one flower to another flower of the same type, moving pollen from stamens to pistils 2. For which of the following do many pIants depend on animals? (SI-E-A3) A. Photosynthesis B. Shelter C. Seed dispersal 3. Which of the following lists something that animals cannot depend directly on plants to provide? (SI-E-AIZ) A. Food and some water 8. The animals’ life cycle CA place to hide from predators and escape the hot sun ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course EDCI 3125 taught by Professor Webb during the Fall '11 term at LSU.

Page1 / 5

How_Plants_Help_Animals_Survive - Lesson Plan Template...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online