PS 367 Lecture18

PS 367 Lecture18 - Defining Third-Party Bias • A third...

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Unformatted text preview: Defining Third-Party Bias • A third party is biased when its interests in a crisis are closely aligned with a single disputant’s interests • Bias affects whether and how a third party becomes involved in a conflict – Biased parties are more likely to intervene in conflicts – Depending on the intervener’s resources, bias can determine whether mediation, coercion or military intervention is employed • Can bias determine the success or failure of an intervention? How? 1 Research on Third-Party Bias • Three strands of research: 1. Impartiality is necessary for successful peace negotiations 2. Impartiality is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for reaching settlements 3. Biased third parties can even be valuable • In evaluating the role of bias, we must be careful first to identify who is intervening and how 2 Bias and Limited Coercive Power • Third parties with limited coercive potential usually serve as mediators • “Weak” third parties draw their strength from their perceived impartiality and desire for fair outcomes • Desire to appear impartial may interfere with the mediator’s ability to find workable solutions 3 Bias and Coercive Power • Powerful third parties can mediate, coerce, or wage a war against a disputant(s) • Bias can determine the manner and the outcome of an intervention: – Unbiased powerful interveners are more likely to mediate ∗ Since powerful mediators have many resources, they can be very effective – Biased powerful interveners are more likely to coerce ∗ If they are very biased, they are likely to be taken more seriously, resulting in a successful intervention ∗ If they are biased, but not significantly biased, their threats may not be taken seriously, resulting in an unsuccessful intervention 4 !"#$%#&'%"&()*+)&,-&%$(*#()./% Bias and Coercive Power • When a third party has plenty of coercive potential, bias can determine the outcome of an intervention: 5 ...
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PS 367 Lecture18 - Defining Third-Party Bias • A third...

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