introduction to social psychology

introduction to social psychology - Introduction to Social...

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Unformatted text preview: Introduction to Social Psychology Definition of Social Psychology The branch of psychology concerned with how others influence the way a person thinks, feels, and acts. Social psychology demonstrates how others affect us powerfully Social environments can be more powerful than individual dispositions Social expectations create both our social reality and internalized individual psychological states Two Important Themes 1- We tend to vastly underestimate the power of situations in shaping our own and other peoples behaviors 2-A great deal of mental activity occurs automatically and without conscious awareness or intent (implicit schemas, attitudes, etc.) Core Concepts in Social Psychology Fundamental Attribution Error Social Comparison (better than average) Attitudes (implicit and explicit) Persuasion Self-fulfilling Prophecy Confirmation Biases Cognitive Dissonance Deindividuation Dehumanization Bystander Apathy Obedience Conformity The Fundamental Attribution Error Definition: How we make attributions about others The Just World Hypothesis Victims must have deserved it Three attribution dimensions 1) Personal vs Situational 2) Stable vs Variable 3) Controllable vs Uncontrollable Attributional style if depressed? Attitudes A persons evaluation of objects, events, or ideas From the trivial to core values We have explicit and implicit attitudes Attitudes do not always predict behavior Behaviors can change attitudes Stereotypes Stereotypes Cognitive schemas that organize information about people based on their membership in certain groups Once form a stereotype (label), then Confirmation Bias to maintain it Prejudice is emotional or attitudinal response associated with stereotype Stereotypes Impacts on perception (Diallo case) Research can change this response of associating black face with weapon by computer training with officers in which race unrelated to presence of weapon Self-fulfilling prophecy occurs with stereotypes Persuasion can change Attitudes What marketing is all about Elaboration Likelihood Model If use central route processing (use rational cognitive processes) stronger attitudes, less resistant to change If use peripheral route processing not as strong (classical conditioning of watch + favorite star) Persuasion can change Attitudes Politics: One sided arguments best if on side already, if not two sided arguments best Arguments that appeal to emotions most effective If you repeat a lie enough, people believe it Cognitive Dissonance Importance of maintaining view of self The perceptual incongruity that occurs when there is a contradiction between two attitudes or between an attitude and behavior Dissonance causes anxiety/tension and motivated to reduce by changing attitude or behavior Cognitive Dissonance research:...
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introduction to social psychology - Introduction to Social...

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