104 9.4 conf. int. props.

104 9.4 conf. int. props. - 9.3,9.4 Confidence Intervals...

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9.3,9.4 Confidence Intervals For Proportions and Testing Hypotheses About Proportions Researchers often want to estimate the proportion of a population with a particular characteristic. For example, A Physical Anthropologist may want to know the fraction of a population with blood type A. To get this estimate the researcher would need to take a random sample of size n, and determine for each individual whether or not they have blood type A. For a sample from a large population the number with blood type A satisfies the four requirements of a binomial distribution (assume success is selecting a person with blood type A). 1) Number of trials (individuals sampled) = n 2) Each individual is either blood type A or not type A 3) For a large population there is a constant probability that the next person sampled is type A. 4) the sample is random so the trials are independent . The number in the sample with type A Blood, x, is distributed as a B(n,p) p = type A proportion for the population From chapter seven we know that as the sample size increases a
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104 9.4 conf. int. props. - 9.3,9.4 Confidence Intervals...

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