204 6.2 binomial dist

204 6.2 binomial dist - 6.2 The Binomial Distribution A...

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6.2 The Binomial Distribution A binomial distribution occurs when an experiment with two possible outcomes ( success or failure ) is repeated several times. Each repetition of the experiment is called a trial . Examples of binomial distributions are: a) The number of defectives in a sample from an assembly line b) The number of questions correct on a multiple choice exam When answers are chosen by guessing c) The number of heads in n flips of a coin Note that the trials result in only success or failure and not a numerical value, thus only categorical data are needed for a binomial distribution. Requirements for a Binomial Distribution: 1) A fixed number of trials n 2) Each trial results in either success or failure 3) The probability of success, p, is constant for all trials 4) The trials are independent Example: Let’s now calculate the probability of 2 defectives in a sample of size 5. Assume the manufacturing process has a 10% defective rate (p = .10); thus the probability of first getting two
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This note was uploaded on 12/05/2011 for the course MATH 2040 taught by Professor Raysievers during the Fall '10 term at Utah Valley University.

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204 6.2 binomial dist - 6.2 The Binomial Distribution A...

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