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RelativeResourceManager76 - Lecture 7: Graphic Design Fall...

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Fall 2003 6.893 UI Design and Implementation 1 Lecture 7: Graphic Design
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Fall 2003 6.893 UI Design and Implementation 2 UI Hall of Fame or Shame? Source: Vishy Venugopalan This Flash-driven web site is the Museum of Modern Art’s Workspheres exhibition, a collection of objects related to the modern workplace. This is its main menu: an array of identical icons. Mousing over any icon makes its label appear (the yellow note shown), and clicking brings up a picture of the object. Clearly there’s a metaphor in play here: the interface represents a wall covered with Post-it notes, and you can zoom in on any one of them. We can praise this site for at least one reason: incredible simplicity . The designer of this site was clearly striving for aesthetic appeal. Nothing unnecessary was included. Note the use of whitespace to group the list of categories on the right, and the simple heading highlight that gives a clue to the function of the list (clicking on a category name highlights all the icons in that category). Unfortunately, too much that was necessary was left out. Without any visible differentiation between the icons, finding something requires a lot of mouse waving. “Mystery navigation” was the term used by Vishy Venugopalan, who nominated this candidate for the UI Hall of Shame. It’s hard enough to skim the display for interesting objects to look at. But imagine trying to find an object you’ve seen before. It’s like that old card game Concentration, demanding too much recall from the user, rather than offering easy opportunities to recognize what you’re looking for. Frankly, if real Post-it notes were arranged on a wall like this, you’d probably have just as much trouble navigating it. So the choice of metaphor may be the essence of the problem.
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Fall 2003 6.893 UI Design and Implementation 3 More “Mystery Navigation” Source: Adam Champy This is the home page for Movado, a company that makes expensive, stylish watches. The little white dots at the top of the window are menu options. If you watched the opening animation that precedes this screen, you’d see each menu label appear briefly over each dot. But if you skipped over the intro, you wouldn’t see that, and you may not even realize that a menu is hiding up there under those stylish white dots. When you mouse over a dot, you actually have to wait for a cute little animation (a watch hand sweeping around the dot) before the menu label appears. Each little animation takes 2 seconds. So scanning the entire menu to look at all the options takes 16 seconds! Clearly this is even worse than MOMA’s approach, since it starts with an invisible menu interface and makes it inefficient to boot. More tellingly, MOMA only cares about your eyeballs, but Movado actually wants to sell you a watch. If you can’t figure out their menu, or lose patience with it, you may be headed elsewhere.
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Fall 2003 6.893 UI Design and Implementation 4 Let’s Play a Menu Game Source: Tyler Horton Here’s our last entry: Mandarina Duck, a website that sells designer products like clothes,
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This note was uploaded on 12/05/2011 for the course IST 352 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Syracuse.

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RelativeResourceManager76 - Lecture 7: Graphic Design Fall...

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