{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

C18-BTree-Fall2009

C18-BTree-Fall2009 - External Memory Dictionary Task Given...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
External Memory Dictionary Task: Given a large amount of data that does not fit into main memory, process it into a dictionary data structure. Need to minimize number of disk accesses With each disk read, read a whole block of data Construct a balanced search tree that uses one disk block per tree node Each node needs to contain more than one key 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
From Binary to k-ary A k-ary search tree T is defined as follows: For each node x of T : x has at most k children x stores an ordered list of pointers to its children x stores an ordered list of keys x fulfils the search tree property: keys in the subtree rooted at i -th child keys in subtree rooted at ( i + 1)-st child. 2
Background image of page 2
Chapter 18: B-Trees A B-tree is a balanced tree scheme in which balance is achieved by permitting the nodes to have multiple keys and more than two children. 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Definition Let t 2 be an integer. A tree T is called a B-tree having minimum degree t if the leaves of T are at the same depth and each node u has the following properties: 1. u has at most 2 t - 1 keys. 2. If u is not the root, u has at least t - 1 keys. 3. The keys in u are sorted in the increasing order. 4. The number of u ’s children is precisely one more than the number of u ’s keys. 5. For all i 1, if u has at least i keys and has children, then every key appearing in the subtree rooted at the i -th child of u is less than the i -th key and every key appearing in the subtree rooted at the ( i + 1)-st child of u is greater than the i -th key. 4
Background image of page 4
S R P D Y W V M N QTX H L K J FG BC Z root[T] 5
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Notation Let u be a node in a B-tree. By n [ u ] we denote the number of keys in u . For each i , 1 i n [ u ], key i [ u ] denotes the i -th key of u . For each i , 1 i n [ u ] + 1, c i [ u ] denotes the i -th child of u . Terminology For the sake of simplicity we will introduce some terminology. We say that a node is full if it has 2 t - 1 keys and we say that a node is lean if it has the minimum number of keys, that is t - 1 keys in the case of a non-root and 1 in the case of the root. 2-3-4 Trees B-trees with minimum degree 2 are called 2-3-4 trees to signify that the number of children is two, three, or four. 6
Background image of page 6
Depth of a B-tree Theorem A Let t 2 and n be integers. Let T be an arbitrary B-tree with minimum degree t having n keys. Let h be the height of T . Then h log t n +1 2 . Proof The height is maximized when all the nodes are lean. If T is of that form, the number of keys in T is 1+ h X i =1 2( t - 1) t i - 1 = 2( t - 1) t h - 1 t - 1 +1 = 2 t h - 1 . Thus the depth of a B-tree is at most 1 lg t of the depth of an RB-tree. 7
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Searching for a key k in a B-tree Start with x = root [ T ]. 1. If x = nil , then k does not exist. 2. Compute the smallest i such that the i -th key at x is greater than or equal to k .
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}