408 Lab 2

408 Lab 2 - EXSC 408L Introduction to Biomechanics Lab 2...

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EXSC 408L Fall ‘11 Introduction to Biomechanics Lab 2 – Introduction to Linear Kinematics and TBCM Model Page 1 of 13 Lab #2 – Introduction to Linear Kinematics and Total Body Center of Mass Model Kinematics is the geometry of motion. Purpose: The objective of this lab is to provide you with a thorough introduction to linear kinematics and the total body center of mass (TBCM) model. Upon completion of this lab you will: Know some principles of videography Understand how to observe a movement, break it into phases, and perform appropriate analyses to answer your particular questions of interest. Understand and know how to calculate linear kinematic variables. Have the tools to begin your own linear kinematic analyses of upcoming athletic events. Understand and know how to calculate TBCM Understand and be able to use the digitizing applet. Introduction: I. VIDEOGRAPHY PRINCIPLES General Information: 1. To ensure video quality and camera stabilization, the camcorder should always be attached to a tripod. 2. Tripod use: Raise or lower the camera height by extending the tripod legs, not by using the handle and crank. 3. Either scout out an A/C outlet well before you begin or make certain that the camera battery will be fully charged for filming. This should be done the day before the collection. Quantitative Two-Dimensional Videotaping: 1. To ensure accurate segment length and joint angle measurements, make certain that the camera is purely perpendicular to the plane of motion of the object being videotaped. 2. Check the lighting conditions for your subject. You do not want the video camera facing into the sun; it is preferable to have the sun behind you. If applicable, use a reflector to illuminate dark areas on the subject. Be prepared to use supplementary lighting. If you are collecting indoors, make certain that the lights are appropriately placed and watch that they do not overheat. 3. The camera must be level in both the fore/aft (front/back or anterior/posterior) direction and the lateral (side/side) directions. This can be done by placing a small bubble level on the top the camera. If a small level is not available, the level on the tripod may be used, but it is not always as accurate as an external level placed on top of the camera. 4. The camera should be as far away from the subject as possible, yet the image size should be as large as possible. You can achieve this by using a large zoom factor for the video camera lens. Ideally, the videotaped activity will fill the entire field of view with only a small margin of "unused" image space at the edges of the display. 5. Make sure the camera is in manual focus mode. Other settings: White Balance – Auto; S-VHS – On; Balance – Middle position; Iris – Middle position. 6.
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408 Lab 2 - EXSC 408L Introduction to Biomechanics Lab 2...

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