PALD_Journalism_Writing_Guide_20100519_Master_

PALD_Journalism_Writing_Guide_20100519_Master_ - Public...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Public Affairs Leadership Department Journalism Writing Guide
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Journalism Writing Guide PALD Journalism Writing Guide Last update: May 2010 (All other versions are obsolete.) 2 Table of Contents Plagiarism 3 Introduction to PA writing 5 AP Stylebook 7 Copy editing 11 Copy-editing symbols 13 Common writing mistakes 14 AP Stylebook exercise 18 Characteristics of newsworthiness 19 The summary news lead 21 News bridge and body 25 Attribution 29 Internal news story 31 External news release 35 Feature writing 39 Initial accident news release 41 Accident follow-up release 46 Editorials 48 Letter to the editor 58 Headlines 61 DINFOS basic news writing tips 62 Grading symbols 64
Background image of page 2
Journalism Writing Guide PALD Journalism Writing Guide Last update: May 2010 (All other versions are obsolete.) 3 Plagiarism Plagiarism is not tolerated at the Defense Information School. Your credibility and the credibility of your service or organization depend on your ethics. All students are required to read, sign and adhere to the DINFOS plagiarism statement. The following italicized text comes from the plagiarism.org website: According to the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, to "plagiarize" means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own to use (another's production) without crediting the source to commit literary theft to present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source. In other words, plagiarism is an act of fraud. It involves both stealing someone else's work and lying about it afterward. But can words and ideas really be stolen? According to U.S. law, the answer is yes. The expression of original ideas is considered intellectual property, and is protected by copyright laws, just like original inventions. Almost all forms of expression fall under copyright protection as long as they are recorded in some way (such as a book or a computer file). All of the following are considered plagiarism: turning in someone else's work as your own copying words or ideas from someone else without giving credit failing to put a quotation in quotation marks giving incorrect information about the source of a quotation changing words but copying the sentence structure of a source without giving credit copying so many words or ideas from a source that it makes up the majority of your work, whether you give credit or not (see our section on "fair use" rules) Most cases of plagiarism can be avoided, however, by citing sources. Simply acknowledging that certain material has been borrowed, and providing your audience with the information necessary to find that source, is usually enough to prevent plagiarism. See our section on citation for more information on how to cite sources properly.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 66

PALD_Journalism_Writing_Guide_20100519_Master_ - Public...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online