MyChapter9

MyChapter9 - WebDevelopment&DesignFoundations...

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with XHTML (The Book’s way) MyChapter9.ppt Chapter 9 Using Forms. The book has not given the source codes for many  examples in this chapter. Further, most of the examples are  somewhat useless. I have included the book’s sample  codes in an XHTML1.1 compliant page named  BooksExamplesCh9ModifiedByAhmed.htm  file. MyChapter9.ppt 1
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2 Learning  Outcomes In this chapter, you will learn how to: Describe common uses of forms on web pages Create forms on web pages using the <form>,  <input />, <textarea>, and <select> tags Create forms that provide additional accessibility features using the  accesskey and tabindex attributes Associate form elements and element groups using the <label>,  <fieldset>, and <legend> tags Create custom image buttons and use the <button> tag to include  more variety and richer content than the standard form button Describe the features of CGI  (This will the major topic in our  2 nd   course: INFS 4300: Web App. Development II). However we will  cover whatever the textbook has given us. Invoke server-side processing to handle form data  (We will not  cover it in our class). However we will cover whatever the  textbook has given us. Find free CGI resources on the Web  (We will not cover it in our  class) MyChapter9.ppt
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Say it loud: The <form> tag is not necessary to collect data and take actions at the client side. Data can be collected using various XHTML1.1 controls (like textbox, checkbox, radio buttons, etc.). These data can also be processed at the client-side using the JavaScript client-side code. The <form> tag is necessary only when we need to send the collected data to the server and take actions at the server using ASP.NET, PHP, Pearl, or similar server-side processing techniques. MyChapter9.ppt 3
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In Chapter 9, the author has discussed many features of the <form> tag. The <form> tag is needed to collect data from the user and process the user-given data at the server-side. If we simply want to collect data from the user and process the data at the client side (using JavaScript), actually we do not require the form tag. In any case, it does not hurt us from coding the <form> tag even if we do not submit the data to the server for server side processing. In the later part of the semester, we will cover the <form> tag in details. At this stage, let us simply study the materials of this chapter. MyChapter9.ppt 4
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5 Overview of Forms Forms are used all over the Web to  Accept information (collect data from the user) Provide interactivity  Types of forms: Search form, Order form, Newsletter sign-up  form, Survey form, Add to Cart form, and so  on… MyChapter9.ppt
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6 Overview of Forms Form An XHTML element that contains and 
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MyChapter9 - WebDevelopment&amp;DesignFoundations...

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