is - Enterprise Information Systems 1 School Name...

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Enterprise Information Systems 1 School Name Enterprise Information Systems Your Name Student ID Class Professor Date Due
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Enterprise Information Systems 2 Enterprise Information Systems In recent decades, large organizations have developed increasingly complex portfolios of information systems to support business processes. Maintaining and strengthening these complex call systems have become a major challenge for many boards. The challenge is even greater for organizations that are the result of mergers. The question that arises is whether, from both operational and strategic perspective, if it would be feasible to migrate to a single complex system. The method involves the allocation of an organization's systems and information showing its role in business processes. The methods for enterprise architecture(EA), such as the framework of the open architecture recognize the importance of modeling requirements in the development of enterprise architectures. Modeling support is necessary to specify, document, communicate and reason about the goals and requirements. Current modeling techniques focus on EA's products, services, processes and applications of a company. Furthermore, the techniques can always be ready to describe the structural requirements and use cases. Little support is available yet for modeling the underlying motivation of EA in terms of stakeholder concerns and high-level objectives address these concerns. This article describes a language that supports the modeling of this motivation. The definition of the language is based on existing work in high-level goals and requirements modeling and adjusted to an existing standard for enterprise modeling: ArchiMate language. In
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Enterprise Information Systems 3 addition, the article shows how EA can benefit from the techniques of domain analysis of requirements engineering. Enterprise information security architectures, or EISA, are a part of enterprise
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course ACCT 200 taught by Professor Forny during the Spring '11 term at Art Inst. Phoenix.

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is - Enterprise Information Systems 1 School Name...

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