final paper child development

Final paper child - Developmental Theories 1 Key Concepts of the Developmental Theories Jamie Rhoads PSY 104 Child and Adolescent Development Dr

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Developmental Theories - 1 - Key Concepts of the Developmental Theories Jamie Rhoads PSY 104 : Child and Adolescent Development Dr. Andrew Fletcher
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Developmental Theories - 2 - Child development that occurs from birth to adulthood was largely ignored throughout much of history. Children were often viewed simply as small versions of adults and little attention was paid to the many advances in cognitive abilities, language usage, and physical growth. Many scientists and researchers have approached the study of child development over the last hundred or so years, only a few of the theories that have resulted have stood the test of time and have proven to be widely influential. Some of these theories are Erik Erikson’s psychocial theory, Lawrence Kohlberg’s moral understanding theory, and Jean Piaget’s cognitive development theory. Each of these theories have key concepts involving the development of children throughtout all aspects of their childhood. Erik Erikson used Freud's work as a starting place to develop a theory about human stage development from birth to death. In contrast to Freud's focus on sexuality, Erikson focused on how peoples' sense of identity develops; how people develop or fail to develop abilities and beliefs about themselves which allow them to become productive, satisfied members of society. Erikson's theory combines how people develop beliefs psychologically and mentally with how they learn to exist within a larger community of people, this is why the theory is called psychosocial. Erikson’s stages are, trust versus mistrust; autonomy versus shame and doubt; initiative versus guilt; industry versus inferiority; identity versus identity confusion; intimacy versus isolation; generativity versus stagnation; and integrity versus despair. Each stage is associated with a time of life and a general age span. For each stage, Erikson's theory explains what types of stimulation children need
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Developmental Theories - 3 - to master that stage and become productive and well-adjusted members of society and explains the types of problems and developmental delays that can result when this stimulation does not occur. The first psychosocial stage is trust versus mistrust, and it spans from birth to about age one year. During this phase, if
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This note was uploaded on 12/05/2011 for the course BUS 550 taught by Professor Rupe during the Spring '11 term at Ashford University.

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Final paper child - Developmental Theories 1 Key Concepts of the Developmental Theories Jamie Rhoads PSY 104 Child and Adolescent Development Dr

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